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Athabasca University

Norman Temple

Professor, Nutrition

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My academic interests are in diet in relation to the diseases of lifestyle, such as heart disease. I have written 85 papers on my research (see below). I have also written or edited 15 books, including:

  • Western Diseases: Their Dietary Prevention and Reversibility (with Denis Burkitt) (1994)
  • Excessive Medical Spending: Facing the Challenge (2007)
  • Nutritional Health: Strategies for Disease Prevention (3rd edition, 2012)
  • Community Nutrition for Developing Countries (2016)
  • Nutrition Guide for Physicians and Related Healthcare Professionals (2nd edition, 2017)

I have made several trips to Cape Town, South Africa, where I carry out research in collaboration with my colleagues there. This work has centred on the role of the changing diet in South Africa on the pattern of diseases in that country, such as obesity, diabetes, and heart disease.

Selected Papers

Temple NJ (1999). Survey of nutrition knowledge of Canadian physicians. Journal of the American College of Nutrition 18: 26-29.

Temple NJ (2000). Antioxidants and disease: more questions than answers. Nutrition Research 20: 449-459.

Temple NJ, Steyn K, Hoffman M, Levitt NS, Lombard CJ (2001). The epidemic of obesity in South Africa: a study in a disadvantaged community. Ethnicity Disease 11: 431-437.

Temple NJ, Balay-Karperien A (2002). Nutrition in cancer prevention: an integrated approach. Journal of the American College of Nutrition 21: 79-83.

Temple NJ (2002). Nutrition and disease: challenges of research design. Nutrition 18: 343-347.

Steyn NP, Mann J, Bennett PH, Temple NJ, Zimmet P, Tuomilehto J, Lindstromn J, Louherantha A (2004). Diet, nutrition and prevention of type 2 diabetes. Public Health Nutrition 7: 147-165. (This paper was prepared at the request of WHO as part of an expert consultation on diet and disease.)

Thompson A, Temple NJ (2004). The case for statins: Has it really been made? Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine 97: 461-464.

Temple NJ, Steyn NP, Myburgh NG, Nel JH. (2006). Food items consumed by students attending schools in different socio-economic areas in Cape Town, South Africa. Nutrition 22: 252-258.

Temple NJ, Kemp WC, Benson WA. (2006). Computer technology and student preferences in a nutrition course. Open Learning 21: 71-77.

Temple NJ (2007). Strategies for health promotion. Facing the challenge in South Africa. Ethnicity Disease 17: 749-754.

Temple NJ, Eley D, Nowrouzi B. (2009). Advice on dietary supplements: a comparison of health food stores and pharmacies in Canada. Journal of the American College of Nutrition 28: 667-673.

Temple NJ, Steyn NP. (2011). The cost of a healthy diet: A South African perspective. Nutrition 2: 505-508.

McEvoy C, Temple N, Woodside JV. (2012). Vegetarian diets, low-meat diets and health: a review. Public Health Nutrition 15: 2287-2294.

Steyn NP, Temple NJ. (2012). Evidence to support a food-based dietary guideline on sugar consumption in South Africa. BMC Public Health 12: 502.

Mchiza ZJ, Temple NJ, Steyn NP, Abrahams Z, Clayford M. (2013). Content analysis of television food advertisements aimed at adults and children in South Africa. Public Health Nutrition 16: 2213-2220.

Temple NJ, Fraser J. (2014). Food labels: a critical assessment. Nutrition 30: 257-260.

Temple NJ, Fraser J. (2014). How accurate are Wikipedia articles in health, nutrition, and medicine? Canadian Journal of Information and Library Science 38: 37-52.

Temple NJ. (2016). Strategic nutrition: a vision for the twenty-first century. Public Health Nutrition 19: 164-175.

Temple NJ (2016). How reliable are randomized controlled trials for studying the relationship between diet and disease? A narrative review. British Journal of Nutrition 116: 381–389.

Educational Philosophy

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Updated December 11 2014 by Student & Academic Services

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